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US Recognizes ISIS Persecution against Assyrians as Genocide

Crocodile Bani

Active member
Your examples sound more like projects than aims. 

Examples of aims are: 

Are we just a group of Assyrian university students and if so, what exactly are we out to achieve by forming this group? 

Are we a group of university graduates?  Do we also include those who studied hair dressing at a TAFE college?  If so, should we include current university students?  Why or why not?  How many rights do students have?  Either way, what exactly are we trying to achieved by forming this group?

Are we a surrogate political group? Do we get involved at all in areas that politicians would normally get involved with?  Do we make statements on behalf of the Assyrian people in the absence of statements from our political leaders?

Are we in existence to encourage young Assyrians to follow the path to academic success?  Are we here to provide encouragement and other help to make the academic dreams of Assyrians comes true? 

Should we just concentrate on activities such as parties and picnics to engage the youth, in order to encourage young Assyrians to mix with the academics of the community?  Is a publications committee necessary?  If so, what is the purpose of the monthly magazine, 'Purely academic"?
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My list could go on but I think you get the drift.  The one thing we ever agreed upon was not to take any sides in the church debate or favour the Nineveh Club over the Culture Club (or vice versa).  Remain neutral in areas such as politics and religion when there are multiple institutions. 

Don't get me wrong.  TAAAS did some great things and achieved some great things but they only happened when people with one vision worked together.  Once it became a fractured and divided group, it became dysfunctional and eventually fell by the wayside.
 

mrzurnaci

Active member
Crocodile Bani said:
Your examples sound more like projects than aims. 

Examples of aims are: 

Are we just a group of Assyrian university students and if so, what exactly are we out to achieve by forming this group? 

Are we a group of university graduates?  Do we also include those who studied hair dressing at a TAFE college?  If so, should we include current university students?  Why or why not?  How many rights do students have?  Either way, what exactly are we trying to achieved by forming this group?

Are we a surrogate political group? Do we get involved at all in areas that politicians would normally get involved with?  Do we make statements on behalf of the Assyrian people in the absence of statements from our political leaders?

Are we in existence to encourage young Assyrians to follow the path to academic success?  Are we here to provide encouragement and other help to make the academic dreams of Assyrians comes true? 

Should we just concentrate on activities such as parties and picnics to engage the youth, in order to encourage young Assyrians to mix with the academics of the community?  Is a publications committee necessary?  If so, what is the purpose of the monthly magazine, 'Purely academic"?
********************************************

My list could go on but I think you get the drift.  The one thing we ever agreed upon was not to take any sides in the church debate or favour the Nineveh Club over the Culture Club (or vice versa).  Remain neutral in areas such as politics and religion when there are multiple institutions. 

Don't get me wrong.  TAAAS did some great things and achieved some great things but they only happened when people with one vision worked together.  Once it became a fractured and divided group, it became dysfunctional and eventually fell by the wayside.

And why did it fracture? The best medicine is prevention which begs to ask why did it fracture and divide? Why was there no compromise between groups?

To me, this is selfish thinking because they were thinking about THEIR ideas of thinking about how all the groups could benefit as a whole.

If I can be that move quoter everybody hates ;) ...

From the Lord of the Rings...

The king of the Elves, Elrond, I quote saying "Isildur kept the Ring. It should have ended that day, but evil was allowed to endure. There's no strength left in the world of Men. They're scattered, divided, leaderless."

This quote can easily be attributed to Assyrians, we are scattered and divided BUT we have too many leaders squabbling with each other that we are effectively leaderless because all of those "leaders" have drown themselves out and never learn to compromise.
 

Crocodile Bani

Active member
In principle, I agree with you 100%.  In reality, without clear aims, everybody was bound to have their own idea.  Compare it with an orchestra without a conductor.  Every member of the orchestra can play their instrument but without a conductor, the orchestra will sound like pregnant cows.  TAAAS was the same. No clear aim or purpose, therefore everyone had their own idea of what they were about or should be about.  The sad reality was, it took 4 years of meetings among a core group of Assyrian university students to come up with aims, but as soon as others from outside came along, it was fractured before it was actually established.  The outsiders to their credit worked very hard and achieved several good things, but nobody understood their aims, especially as it was vastly different from what the original group of university students intended.
 

Cascade

Active member
mrzurnaci said:
From the Lord of the Rings...

The king of the Elves, Elrond, I quote saying "Isildur kept the Ring. It should have ended that day, but evil was allowed to endure. There's no strength left in the world of Men. They're scattered, divided, leaderless."

This quote can easily be attributed to Assyrians, we are scattered and divided BUT we have too many leaders squabbling with each other that we are effectively leaderless because all of those "leaders" have drown themselves out and never learn to compromise.
Very good analogy there though.
 
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