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lakha or akha ?

Zawoyo

New member
I have a question because of the word "here" in eastern Assyrian.

I always hear the word lakha to "here" but I heard from a friend that it´s akha.
He gave me this example:

come here = talokh l-akha
it is here = akha ile

The l stands for to. And the phrase talokh l-akha means literally "come to here"

What do You think about that, is it right?
 

davidb

New member
I doubt there is a correct one, I'm pretty sure Akha is just a shortened version of Lakha. And again, which word you use depends on what village you come from, just another dialect/accent thing.
 

dowidh

New member
I agree with Davidb, it's probably just shortened. On a related topic, you should know that in Semitic languages often certain letters disappear under certain conditions. If my Aramaic grammar book doesn't have typos, it says that ܐ ܗ ܘ ܚ ܝ ܠ ܢ ܪ are sometimes not pronounced and it is sometimes marked by a line called ܡܒܛܠܢܐ (surpresser). In Biblical Hebrew there are letters that sometimes disappear all together - א ה ו י (the quiescent letters) and ל נ (which often assimulate). There may be other letters in Hebrew that disappear too, but I couldn't find further infomation about it in my Grammar book.
 

Zawoyo

New member
As far as we know the l is used for localization.
Words like "house" , "city", "here" and so on are localizations.

If I want to say ...
... "come to the house" I say talokh l beyta
... "come to the city" ... talokh l mdita
... "come here" ... talokh l akha

@Tears of Assyria
We use in west a similar or same word for harka, we say harke. In Assyrian font both is written in the same way (without the dots).
"Come here" is in west tolokh l (h)arke.
 

davidb

New member
Common speech -

... "come to the house" I say ta l beyta
... "come to the city" ... ta l mdita
... "come here" ... ta l akha

 

Carlo

Active member
I think Tears is right. We have akha (classically ܟܐ, ka) = "here," and lakha (classically ܠܟܐ, lkha) = "to here" ("hither" in older English).

I don't think people use them that way nowadays, kind of like how people use "atee" meaning "you (man or woman)," but technically "atee" should be used for a woman and "at" for a man.
 

Tambur

New member
Tears is correct on this, Kha (Kap, Alap) + La (Lamad) = Lakha, and akha just has a silent Lamad probably for shortcut.

I'm just curious, what do western Assyrians say? Because I hear the word Harke a lot frm them.
 

Knight

Active member
Tambur said:
Kha (Kap, Alap)
I believe that's incorrect.

Kha (Hheth, Alap), in arabic it's wa7id.....in Aramaic it's "Hhadh" or "7adh"

It's not a Kap, it's a Hheth!
 

Tambur

New member
Knight said:
I believe that's incorrect.

Kha (Hheth, Alap), in arabic it's wa7id.....in Aramaic it's "Hhadh" or "7adh"

It's not a Kap, it's a Hheth!
This is not incorrect, Kha which is spelled Kap/Alap does indeed mean "Here", also Kha for number one is spelled khet/dalat, there's no Alap in there (Unless you put the Alap before the Khet and it becomes Akhad which is proper also).

A lot of times Kap is pronounced Khap, words such as (The bold KH is Kap):

Buraakha
Kikhwa
Shlama-Lukh
So on...

This also exists in Hebrew with the same exact letter, with Arabic on the other hand it's never pronounced as KH, it is also said that the Khet is originally a Het, while the Kh sound in our language originally came from Khap, but of course this will depend on the dialect, for example this is indeed the case in Western Assyrian, but in Eastern Assyrian it's not because there are more dialects and it's all mixed.
 

Zawoyo

New member
Tambur said:
Tears is correct on this, Kha (Kap, Alap) + La (Lamad) = Lakha, and akha just has a silent Lamad probably for shortcut.

I'm just curious, what do western Assyrians say? Because I hear the word Harke a lot frm them.
We say in the west dialect harke to 'here'.
And 'come here' is tolokh l (h)arke.
 

Knight

Active member
Tambur said:
This is not incorrect, Kha which is spelled Kap/Alap does indeed mean "Here", also Kha for number one is spelled khet/dalat, there's no Alap in there (Unless you put the Alap before the Khet and it becomes Akhad which is proper also).

A lot of times Kap is pronounced Khap, words such as (The bold KH is Kap):

Buraakha
Kikhwa
Shlama-Lukh
So on...

This also exists in Hebrew with the same exact letter, with Arabic on the other hand it's never pronounced as KH, it is also said that the Khet is originally a Het, while the Kh sound in our language originally came from Khap, but of course this will depend on the dialect, for example this is indeed the case in Western Assyrian, but in Eastern Assyrian it's not because there are more dialects and it's all mixed.
My bad, lost track of the thread...didnt know what u were referring to.
 

Cascade

New member
Lakha - Urmians, Iraqi Koine, Gawars and Nochiyehs

Akha - Tyaris, Chaldeans, Baznayehs, Barwars and the rest

Jilwayehs say 'hiya' for come btw Lol
 
M

member 326969 Global

Guest
Tears of Assyria said:
there are many words for here

harka
hakha
lakha

the L has to be for = to
la kha = to here
This is correct.

axa = here
il = to
il axa = to here
l'axa = hither
 
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