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How to write this in Assyrian?

Carlo

Active member
Here's the date of birth in the Eastern script (to the best of my knowledge):



It reads tmanta`sar bkhanon qdheem bathreyn alfeen wathmanya, very literally "eighteen in Kanon Qdheem (December) in two thousand(s) and eight." This is the classical language and I'm not 100% sure it's correct, so please get it checked out before you get it permanently tattooed/engraved/whatever it is you're going to do with it. :)

Zawoyo said:
basima! :) raba makhben le?sa madnkhaya, u ap madnkhaya leshani le, zadeq d yalpen le ;)

bayet amret zadeq d kethwen "modi le" sabab it zaw?a (i) qam "le" ?
u iman zadeq d amren "ile" ?
Okay I'm going to answer this in English. :giggle:

"eeleh" becomes "leh" when it comes after a word ending in a vowel. Basically, the vowel conflicts with the "ee-" part at the beginning and having two vowels there would sound strange, so the "ee-" drops out. It's a lot like English "a" (before consonants) vs. "an" (before vowels), so "a car" and "a house" but "an apple" and "an egg." Saying "*a apple" sounds weird with the two vowels, so English sticks an "n" in there to ease pronunciation.

Here are some examples:

  • aw babee leh ("he's my dad")
  • aw babukh eeleh ("he's your [m] dad")
  • aw babekh eeleh ("he's your [f] dad")
  • aw babeh leh ("he's his dad")
  • aw babah leh ("he's her dad")
  • aw baban eeleh ("he's our dad")
  • aw babekhoo leh or aw babekhon eeleh ("he's your [pl] dad")
  • aw babehee leh ("he's their dad")

You can see how "eeleh" changes depending on the sound right before it.

Also John, if you want to be super cool like us Tyaraye, you can say "madhnkhaya" for "madnkhaya" and "ith" for "it" (like how you said "kathwin" instead of "katwin"). Not all of us Eastern dialect speakers have dropped the "th" and "dh." :)

mrzurnaci said:
LIKE THIS!

Carlos: I KNOW I did it right this time >=)!
The numerical values for the numbers "18," "12," and "2008" are right, sure, but have you actually ever seen that notation for expressing dates in Assyrian? I've seen years written like that before, but never days and months. Like I said though, I could be wrong.

Besides, Steve said that he wanted the date spelled out in words instead of just written numerically. :)
 

Steve Pireh

New member
Mrzurnaci and Carlo. Thank you. That's great. Atleast I can take my pick from the date of births.  Numbers or written out. Plus thanks for the names aswell.
 

Zawoyo

New member
basima raba raba malpana myaqra Carlo! :) Ah, You are one of these Assyrians who make every letter "rakikha" which You can make "rakikha" ? I like letters rakikhe but not if every of these letters becomes rakhikha. We have in western Assyrian letters rakikhe too but not every of these letters is rakikha.
 

mrzurnaci

New member
Zawoyo said:
basima raba raba malpana myaqra Carlo! :) Ah, You are one of these Assyrians who make every letter "rakikha" which You can make "rakikha" ? I like letters rakikhe but not if every of these letters becomes rakhikha. We have in western Assyrian letters rakikhe too but not every of these letters is rakikha.
Zawoyo is this right?
 

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Carlo

Active member
Zawoyo said:
basima raba raba malpana myaqra Carlo! :) Ah, You are one of these Assyrians who make every letter "rakikha" which You can make "rakikha" ? I like letters rakikhe but not if every of these letters becomes rakhikha. We have in western Assyrian letters rakikhe too but not every of these letters is rakikha.
La daqra, khonee. :)

Not all of them are rakeekhe, no. Often times the letter will change based on how you change the word. The word I say for "city" is "mdhee(n)ta" (hard taw), but the plural of that is mdheenatha (soft taw). There's also "brata" ("girl") vs. "bnatha" ("girls). But I also say "chalba" instead of "chalwa" for "dog."
 

mrzurnaci

New member
Domanic said:
Okay, because the next generations of assyrians can't speak it. Oh look English is now third most spoken language!
Actually, that may be a good thing in the long run.

Reason why is because Assyrians who lack their language will eventually want to learn their language.

It will present a great opportunity to teach them Classical Syriac, our pure and unmodified language when we were still at the top of our game in medieval period Middle East.
 
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