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Cremation

Zowaa389

New member
OK, this is forbidden in our culture from what I know, yet with the practice becoming now virtually universal among non practicing Moslem/Jewish Iranians here in America, how do you see it's place or lack thereof in our culture?
 

Nina

New member
We do not cremate the departed because we never had that in our traditions, our ancestors buried the dead and that tradition continued as we embraced Christianity, so it is done as per Christ's example. Also long time ago, the Assyrians as Christians used to bury the dead in Koorakha (shroud) and they never used coffins as per later practices, following the example from dust to dust.

Cremation is not cheap either it can cost up to $3000 dollars Canadian and more, and to keep the ashes at a mausoleum, that is another ongoing expense, unless the family wants to keep the ashes at home.

The traditional ceremony and most humble services cost at least $10000 dollars Canadian these days, that is why in some cities where there is a majority of Assyrians, they have made some sort of a collecting committee whereby a certain amount is collected in order to take care of such expenses if a family is of modest means. Otherwise, those who want to plan ahead do buy special plans set by funeral homes.

I think Assyrians should create their own funeral homes and buy plots for the community like they did in Australia, in that manner they can take care of their own and help each other.

Canada permits its cultural communities to keep their traditions as long as they have the necessary permits, for example, muslims in different cities have bought plots and have arranged their own places for such services so they do not mix with others, so that is not forbidden and if Assyrians have such projects, people who do not have the means will not have to pay an arm and a leg to funeral homes which are like specialty groups which force what they have and claim the money they want from bereaving people who at the moment will not be aware of the money they are being charged, thinking that they are honouring a departed while the funeral homes take advantage of that.
 

the_dave

New member
I don't get it how some people can keep their lost ones ashes in the home. Thats just strange to me... They belongs to the nature and should be released, not remain in a urn in a home where someday it might break...
 

Cascade

New member
I believe that we should be cremated. Pity that Assyrians don't practice it. The idea of a attired, groomed body that is made to look very human-like, and top of that, would rot 6 feet under is extremely daunting and oppressive.

At least, with cremation, you're turned into ashes and dust. You're not buried in your bodily form. When you're dead, you cease to exist anyway. I'd rather look like dust than a corpse when I don't exist, if that makes sense. Not to mention, the body is gonna decompose anyway.
 

mrzurnaci

New member
Neon said:
I believe that we should be cremated. Pity that Assyrians don't practice it. The idea of a attired, groomed body that is made to look very human-like, and top of that, would rot 6 feet under is extremely daunting and oppressive.

At least, with cremation, you're turned into ashes and dust. You're not buried in your bodily form. When you're dead, you cease to exist anyway. I'd rather look like dust than a corpse when I don't exist, if that makes sense. Not to mention, the body is gonna decompose anyway.
but if u cremate the body, you destroy all the nutrients and elements that other organisms can use from the body... There's a good reason why we BURY them underground... your nutrients are being used up by the plants near you as the soil breaks up your body from pressure.
 

Cascade

New member
mrzurnaci said:
but if u cremate the body, you destroy all the nutrients and elements that other organisms can use from the body... There's a good reason why we BURY them underground... your nutrients are being used up by the plants near you as the soil breaks up your body from pressure.
I don't think that we care about other organisms and how they thrive. Especially Assyrians. Also, I don't think plants would "reach" you (and flourish from you) if you're inside a stoppered box. Not to mention, coffins are well-enclosed and tight nowadays. They're specially designed to keep out dirt, plant matter and graveyard thieves.

We probably bury our dead because, in biblical days, folks didn't know about the scientific part of decomposition. If they knew about bacteria and microscopic life devouring your body (this would've happened more often back in the day), they'd probably would've opted for cremation or something in that likes. Having your body scavenged is not very spiritual.
 

mrzurnaci

New member
Neon said:
I don't think that we care about other organisms and how they thrive. Especially Assyrians. Also, I don't think plants would "reach" you (and flourish from you) if you're inside a stoppered box. Not to mention, coffins are well-enclosed and tight nowadays. They're specially designed to keep out dirt, plant matter and graveyard thieves.

We probably bury our dead because, in biblical days, folks didn't know about the scientific part of decomposition. If they knew about bacteria and microscopic life devouring your body (this would've happened more often back in the day), they'd probably would've opted for cremation or something in that likes. Having your body scavenged is not very spiritual.
so then how did they explain decomposition? You're telling me ancient peoples didn't see an unburied body decompose?
 

Cascade

New member
mrzurnaci said:
so then how did they explain decomposition? You're telling me ancient peoples didn't see an unburied body decompose?
No idea, tbh. But their idea of decomposition surely wasn't explained by bacteria or microscopic life eating up the bodies. As aforementioned, I doubt they know the concept of bacteria or anything in the likes.

Perhaps they believed the air and dust were the sole factors that decomposed us?

Anyway, according to Christianity, our bodies should be returned to dust (as mentioned in Ecclesiastes 12:7 - "Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it."). I think we just interpreted it this verse to mean a full body burial. Because from how I read it, you can always cremate your body and "return to the earth as it was". The verse isn't really explicitly inciting burial, nor cremation for that matter. So I'm not too sure why we see cremation as a taboo, since the bible wasn't really clear about it (AND burial). :blink:
 
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