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Arabic Orthodox Chanting (So beautiful you will cry).

Cascade

New member
Etain said:
Middle Eastern music is so much better than western lol
I agree and I'm being as objective as I can be. I was never a fan of western folk music. However, Spanish and Russian music may be "western", but they do sound good (they have that "exotic" flavour). :)

The most bland folk music in the West is Irish and Scottish. *shivers*
 

Etain

Member
Neon said:
I agree and I'm being as objective as I can be. I was never a fan of western folk music. However, Spanish and Russian music may be "western", but they do sound good (they have that "exotic" flavour). :)

The most bland folk music in the West is Irish and Scottish. *shivers*
What I like about Middle Eastern music is it never "sold out" or changed much from what it was a thousand years ago. It still has the distinct notes, anyone can listen to it and recognize the region it comes from. Compare that to pop music in East Asia that sounds exactly like ours(American) because the Koreans and Japs copied out style.

I actually like Celtic music, I don't think it's too bland.
 

Cascade

New member
Etain said:
What I like about Middle Eastern music is it never "sold out" or changed much from what it was a thousand years ago. It still has the distinct notes, anyone can listen to it and recognize the region it comes from. Compare that to pop music in East Asia that sounds exactly like ours(American) because the Koreans and Japs copied out style.

I actually like Celtic music, I don't think it's too bland.
But then again, Celtic music still use (a rather over-exploited) chord progression (or a musical mode) commonly associated with American/English pop music (Ionian, Aeolian), hence the "insipidness". Their chords are usually no different to say, Imagine by John Lennon. Don't get me wrong, they still make nice lively music (if a bit blander than the rest), but they're very "standard pop-ish", chords-wise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3xeTpgLP5o

Middle Eastern music is usually either in harmonic minor or Phrygian (these two give off that, distinct "exotic" sound). Romanian gypsy and Indian music also have their own distinct notes too. Thus they would "stand out" too.

 

Etain

Member
Neon said:
But then again, Celtic music still use (a rather over-exploited) chord progression (or a musical mode) commonly associated with American/English pop music (Ionian, Aeolian), hence the "insipidness". Their chords are usually no different to say, Imagine by John Lennon. Don't get me wrong, they still make nice lively music (if a bit blander than the rest), but they're very "standard pop-ish", chords-wise:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3xeTpgLP5o

Middle Eastern music is usually either in harmonic minor or Phrygian (these two give off that, distinct "exotic" sound). Romanian gypsy and Indian music also have their own distinct notes too. Thus they would "stand out" too.
It makes sense. American music , especially country, is descended from Celtic music.
 

Cascade

New member
Etain said:
It makes sense. American music , especially country, is descended from Celtic music.
Yep. And that's why Celtic music will never sound "distinct" or "exotic" to my ears.
 

ins001

New member
Asshur said:
West Assyrian dialect: THIS IS GOOD. Just take 5 min to listen to these ^^
Why does the West Assyrian dialect sound so different!?
sounds like a completely different language
 

Cascade

New member
ins001 said:
Why does the West Assyrian dialect sound so different!?
sounds like a completely different language
I know that this is a controversial topic -- if Western Aramaic is a dialect or a language. But you can safely say that Western Neo-Aramaic (Turoyo for instance) is a discrete language. I can't fathom how Turoyo is a dialect when 85% of it is unintelligible (and I speak Assyrian very well).

I never liked how Assyrian and Turoyo are considered Syriac "dialects". Yes, these varieties are Syriac (just the same way English is Germanic), but they're Syriac languages, rather than Syriac "dialects". What is an Assyrian dialect? Chaldean (although some consider that its own language), Urmian, Tyari, Jelu and Barwar. I believe that Western Aramaic (Turoyo) also has differing dialects?
 

ins001

New member
Neon said:
I know that this is a controversial topic -- if Western Aramaic is a dialect or a language. But you can safely say that Western Neo-Aramaic (Turoyo for instance) is a discrete language. I can't fathom how Turoyo is a dialect when 85% of it is unintelligible (and I speak Assyrian very well).

I never liked how Assyrian and Turoyo are considered Syriac "dialects". Yes, these varieties are Syriac (just the same way English is Germanic), but they're Syriac languages, rather than Syriac "dialects". What is an Assyrian dialect? Chaldean (although some consider that its own language), Urmian, Tyari, Jelu and Barwar. I believe that Western Aramaic (Turoyo) also has differing dialects?
I swear Biblical Hebrew is more comprehensible than Turoyo
 

Cascade

New member
ins001 said:
I swear Biblical Hebrew is more comprehensible than Turoyo
You can say that. Hebrews pronounce their A's and Kh's, like we do. In Turoyo, the A's are O's and Kh's are guttural H's.

If you hear Turoyo spoken quietly in the next room you could easily mistake it for Arabic. Thanks to their guttural consonants, they'll sound close to Arabic. Assyrian Neo-Aramaic sounds somewhat distinct to Arabic (since we don't have guttural A's and H's).

When foreigners hear me speak Assyrian they'd think it's Persian or Hebrew. I'd wager that if they hear Western Aramaic their first guess would be Arabic.  :mrgreen:
 

ins001

New member
Neon said:
You can say that. Hebrews pronounce their A's and Kh's, like we do. In Turoyo, the A's are O's and Kh's are guttural H's.

If you hear Turoyo spoken quietly in the next room you could easily mistake it for Arabic. Thanks to their guttural consonants, they'll sound close to Arabic. Assyrian Neo-Aramaic sounds somewhat distinct to Arabic (since we don't have guttural A's and H's).

When foreigners hear me speak Assyrian they'd think it's Persian or Hebrew. I'd wager that if they hear Western Aramaic their first guess would be Arabic.  :mrgreen:
Don't forget that rigid QA noise they keep making
 

ins001

New member
Neon said:
I dunno, I'd say that Eastern Assyrians say "qa" ("for") a lot.

What does the Western "qa" mean though? And how is it exactly pronounced? Like our qa?
I say "ta".
Your probably thinking, if I say "ta" for "for", then what do I say for "come", I say "sha".
 
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